Raven - "wolf-bird"

krauklis.jpg

Inuit call raven a „wolf-bird”, as it cooperates with wolves – react on their howling, show them location of possible pray while wolves follow raven’s voice. Winter is the time of surviving, when animals have to get used to deep snow, frost and short days. Raven too has to be satieted to survive cold nights; it needs at least 200g meat a day. However, raven is large bird weighting approximately 1 kg so it can go without food for 3 days. Ravens find food flying across forests and checking every part of their territory. In Latvia, territory of one raven couple is about 15km2. When something has been found they have to show it to other predators to get something to eat as they can’t tear large mammal skin. That kind of cooperation is beneficial for both – ravens and predators.

Relations between ravens

Relations in raven society helps survive even the weakest and youngest birds. Ravens do not have their own territory until they are 4-6 years old. Young birds live together in flocks where their number always is changing. When they are ready they form pairs and leave the flock, however, they still do not “own” land so they roam widely looking for food.

If big animal has fallen in the territory of adult raven couple they don’t fight other ravens, however, if there is new couple in their territory, old ones put them in their places. The dominant couple show off their rights and bellicosity. Old ravens raise their “eyebrows” and slick down or fluff up their feathers. Female ravens are more aggressive against other female ravens while male ravens are more aggressive against other male ravens. In this film you will see that other birds too get excited so they come together time to time and clamour a bit to calm down.

In this movie you will see that ravens do not chase magpies, because there is enough food. However, magpies are careful and tries not to get caught. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qY05C2xFHAI